Atlanta is a city with a lush sense of historical culture and pride—art is history here. It is that admired “joie de vivre” that gives the city the artistic reverence and beauty at every street corner, at every restaurant, and in any neighborhood. Art in Atlanta takes you in, makes you feel its love, pain, and social recognizance. It is an experience that every art lover must journey once in their lifetimes. From historical monuments to legendary halls, or to some of the most coveted museums in the United States, here is the perfect art lover’s walking tour of Atlanta.

The King Center
449 Auburn Ave., N.E.
Atlanta, Georgia 30312
(404) 526-8900
www.thekingcenter.org

For 47 years, the King Center has remained a coveted historical monument in Atlanta representing a deep cultural reminder of Atlanta’s tumultuous history with the Civil Rights movement of the ’60s and its most beloved leader, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The King Center has transcended its initial ideals of non-violence and social change and has become a global destination, resource center and community institution for all. Each year it receives nearly 1 million visitors who can browse archives, learn about the movers and shakers in the Civil Rights Movement, or just pay their respects to the great Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Museum Of Contemporary Art Georgia (MOCA GA)
75 Bennett St., N.W. 
Atlanta, GA 30309
(404) 367-8700
www.mocaga.org

If you want to know about some of the most amazing and significant contemporary artist in Atlanta, the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia has the largest archive and collection for your viewing pleasure. Since opening in 2002, it has continued to showcase some of the most amazing visual art by emerging, established and legendary artist in Georgia. If you’re looking for the true voice of Atlanta art, you’ll find it at the Museum of Contemporary Art of Georgia.

Atlanta Cylorama & Civil War Museum
800 Cherokee Ave.
Atlanta, GA 30315
(404) 658-7625
www.atlantacyclorama.org

Atlanta has a rich history. When you dive into that history, you uncover a world far removed from where we are today. Atlanta’s Cyclorama takes visitors back to the Battle of Atlanta, fought on July 22, 1864 during the American Civil War. It’s also home to the largest painting in the world at 42 feet tall and 358 feet in circumference, the Cyclorama painting, which offers breathtaking realism enhanced by foreground of three-dimensional figures and terrain. It’s a visual you’ll never forget and must see with your own eyes to believe its grandeur.

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Museum Of Design Atlanta (MODA)
1315 Peachtree St.
Atlanta, GA 30309
(404) 979-6455
www.museumofdesign.org

Formerly known as the Atlanta International Museum of Art & Design, MODA is where art meets design for a creative explosion that leaves visitors in awe as they marvel through each exhibit. It’s so much more than a place for art lovers to converge; its also an educational hub for those who want to learn about how design works functionally as well as aesthetically. The museum offers classes, tours, programs along with some of the most amazing exhibitions in the city of Atlanta.

High Museum Of Art
1280 Peachtree St., N.E.
Atlanta, GA 30309
(404) 733-4400
www.high.org

When you think about art in Atlanta, and where one should go to view art by worldwide renown artists, there is only one destination that any person from Atlanta will tell you: The High Museum of Art. It offers some of the most sought after exhibits by artists such as Frida Kahlo, Gordon Parks, Pablo Picasso, Johannes Vermeer and more! The museum also serves up great food, exclusive lectures, and music, and mingling tours for patrons. Pencil in this stop on your visit to the great city of Atlanta.

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Marlena Turner is an Atlanta native and graduated from Georgia State University. With interests in technology, arts and music for the past three years, she has written articles published on Examiner.com and Axs.com regarding such topics. In her free time she enjoys video games and movies. Read more on Examiner.com.