Top Oscar Moments Over the Years, in 3 Sentences or Less

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Timothy A. Clary/ AFP

Timothy A. Clary/ AFP

Jennifer Cleary
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Jennifer Cleary
jennifer cleary Top Oscar Moments Over the Years, in 3 Sentences or LessJennifer Cleary is a proud UGA alum and a television, film, and pop culture junkie to the point of becoming the go-to person for celebrity gossip. By her own admission she knows an obscene amount of useless trivia. If you've got a question about a show, film or celebrity, chances are she has an opinion. You can follow her on Twitter at @clearyje.

In honor of the 85th Academy Awards, I’ve put together 10 of the most memorable Oscar moments over the past decade in three sentences or less.

Adrien Brody Kisses Halle Berry— In 2003, Adrien Brody won Best Actor for his performance for “The Pianist.” Overcome with emotion, Brody passionately kissed presenter Halle Berry. Since then Brody’s career has hit a slump, but at least he got to do something that most men only fantasize about.

Melissa Leo Drops the F-Bomb— In a night dedicated to pomp and circumstance, Leo’s acceptance speech will go down in history as a crude blunder. Personally, I don’t think there’s anything wrong with using the f-word to convey your excitement.

James Franco Bombs, Anne Hathaway Overacts— In a failed attempt to appeal to a younger demographic, the Oscars asked stoner guy Franco and theatre geek Hathaway to host the awards. Unfortunately, Franco forgot to take his Adderall, or maybe Hathaway stole his stash. Either way, the mismatched co-hosts blew it, making the 2011 Oscars painful to watch.

“Slumdog Millionaire” Dominates the 2009 Academy Awards— The Danny Boyle film won eight Oscars, including Best Picture and Best Director. However, the film’s real winners were its adorable child actors and “Jai Ho,” the film’s infectious song.

Heath Ledger Wins Posthumous Oscar— At the 2009 Academy Awards, Heath Ledger’s family accepted his posthumous Oscar for “The Dark Knight.” Accepting on the behalf of Ledger’s daughter Matilda, his family’s speech will remain one of the most touching Oscar moments.

Martin Scorcese Finally Wins Best Director— Like soap opera star Susan Lucci, Scorcese is a record loser. Having been nominated five times before for films like “Raging Bull” and “Aviator,” Scorcese finally took home an Oscar for 2006’s “The Departed.” Guess sixth time is a charm?

Kathryn Bigelow Trumps Ex-Husband James Cameron for Best Director— Not only did Bigelow become the first woman to win for Best Director, but her film, “The Hurt Locker,” beat out Cameron’s “Avatar” for Best Picture. Take that, egomaniac!

“Crash” Upsets “Brokeback Mountain”— “Crash” scored one of the biggest upsets in the Academy’s history, taking home Best Picture in 2006. Academy voters preferred “Crash’s” star-studded cast over Ang Lee’s controversial “Brokeback Mountain.” 

Sandra Bullock Wins for Best Actress— After having one of the most successful years of her career, Sandra Bullock won Best Actress for “The Blind Side.” Weeks later, it was revealed her husband, who she adamantly thanked in her acceptance speech, cheated on her. And people say there isn’t an Oscar curse.

Hugh Jackman’s Opening Mono-Song— Hugh Jackman’s opening monologue for the 2009 Academy Awards proved his status as a triple threat. Unfortunately, his performance in this year’s “Les Misérables” didn’t channel the same charm, or even talent.

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