‘Arrow’ Recap: Supervillains

Discussing Season 1, Episode 5
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Arrow Wednesdays 8pm

Arrow — “Damaged” — Pictured (L-R): Byron Mann as Yao Fei and Jeffrey Robinson as Deathstroke — Photo: Jack Rowand/The CW — ©2012 The CW Network. All Rights Reserved

Becca Ritchie
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Becca Ritchie
Becca Ritchie Becca Ritchie claims she's from Mystic Falls, but really, she lives in Atlanta where humidity is her greatest foe. She loves comic books, blue nail polish and Jonathan Taylor Thomas circa 1995. She frequents Twitter to dish about CW shows, and when she's not blogging, she reads too many YA and NA books. She's an Amazon Bestselling Author of the Addicted series, a New Adult Romance. Follow her on Twitter @Becca_Ritchie.

[Spoilers from episode 5 ahead]

Who would have thought Oliver Queen would be investigated as the mysterious Hood so soon? Last episode, he was cuffed and accused of being the Robin Hood-like vigilante for grabbing the hooded jacket out of a trashcan — captured all on video camera. And the most surprising moment: Oliver had planned to be caught by the police in the first place. Since the vigilante arrived the same time he returned to Starling City, he knew it was only a matter of time until someone questioned him.

Let’s discuss the Good, the Great, and the Brilliant moment’s from last night.

The Good: Oliver unbuttons his shirt for Laurel, so she can take a peek of his scars. At first, I thought their little romance was unbelievable. Maybe because Laurel’s been such an ice queen (for good reasons) that any romantic flames fizzled before they sparked. But tonight, her guard dropped as she decided to defend Oliver in his case. Since she remembers the selfish party boy, she hardly believes Oliver could be the vigilante and help other people. Oliver’s subjected to house arrest via an ankle monitor, and he agrees to take a polygraph test to appease Laurel’s father. Detective Lance is adamant that the hooded crusader and the reckless guy who killed his daughter aboard the Queen’s Gambit are one in the same.

When Oliver takes the polygraph, he lies about being at the prison where the vigilante saved Laurel. But he tells the truth when Detective Lance asks him if he ever killed someone. Oliver says yes, admitting that he killed Lance’s daughter, Sarah, when he asked her to come aboard a boat that would sink. I was a little disappointed that Oliver didn’t just say yes and leave it at that. He had just come clean about being tortured on the island, and I think he would’ve gotten away with saying he had to kill men while he was marooned. That seemed to be more of the truth than the former.

After Laurel learns that Oliver wasn’t alone on the island, she convinces him to reveal his scars. They share a tearful kiss that ends with Laurel running out the door. By the end, Laurel questions Oliver’s identity. She says he lied about the prison because he had visited it before when they were children on a field trip. So what else was he lying about? Could he really be the vigilante? I give Laurel big props for being observant. Lana Lang could have used some of her perceptive skills in “Smallville.”

The Great: Diggle dresses as the vigilante while Detective Lance tries to lock Oliver away. Who’s liking Dig, the bodyguard turned Oliver’s best friend? While Oliver’s on house arrest entertaining guests at his inappropriate jail-themed party, Diggle makes an appearance on the streets as the Hood, throwing off everyone’s suspicious that Oliver’s linked with the vigilante.

However, Detective Lance won’t stop to convict Oliver. Detective Lance has come to easily be one of my favorite characters to watch on-screen. Sure, I dislike how he’s trying to capture the vigilante, but his hate that fuels his actions is actually quite fun to watch. Plus, he’s right. Oliver is Arrow. Detective Lance looks so deranged as he tries to pin crimes on Oliver that it’s hard to wish him success, but I wouldn’t want him to stop trying.

The Brilliant: The island! No, we don’t know exactly what had happened to Oliver while he was shipwrecked. But we got more than just a morsel. In fact, the fighting scenes might have just been the best I’ve ever seen on television. And a supervillain wearing an orange and black mask, who DC comic fans know as Deathstroke, finally shows up.

Oliver’s mentor Yao Fei has previously tried to teach Mr. Queen how to kill his own food. Now he’s moved on to archery lessons, and not surprisingly, Oliver can barely shoot a tree. After Yao Fei leaves Oliver for only a moment, Oliver stumbles into a trap planted by Edward Fyers. He questions Oliver about Yao Fei, and our future vigilante stays quiet — even as Slade Wilson (aka Deathstroke) walks in to slice up Oliver’s chest with a knife.

For Oliver’s silence, Yao Fei comes to his rescue and then promptly leaves him safely in the cave. Why exactly is Edward Fyers on the island and in search of Yao Fei? (Side Note: Yoa Fei kicked some serious ass against Deathstroke — a rewind moment for sure!).

Also in the episode: Mrs. Queen bows down to John Barrowman’s villainous character credited as “Well Dressed Man” right now (sneaky, sneaky). Apparently he’s the one who sent an armed butler after Oliver. But Detective Lance shot the butler before anything seriously bad happened.  More secrets to ponder, Mrs. Queen warns her hubby to stop poking around Queen’s Gambit. It seems that Mrs. Queen has all the answers. Thea Queen also questions Oliver’s identity as the Hood because he gave her an arrowhead upon his arrival, but he squashes her suspicion through a sad smile.

Is there anyone else you’d want to discover Oliver’s identity as Arrow? Or is Diggle good for right now? Diggle is most certainly Oliver’s moral voice, whispering in his ear so he won’t be consumed by his revengy plot. Next episode, a group of hockey-masked criminals with machine guns come out to play. Just another day in Starling City.

Becca Ritchie

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